My not so final project

My Learning thing

I. My learning thing: Keeping kids safe online, for parents

If your child is using youtube, there are 4 options for monitoring content. Check out this video for a quick tutorial:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Nf8GTIV4so

Bonus! If you download the Family Link app, you can set a bedtime for your child’s device.

If your child is using an apple device, such as an ipod, ipad, or iphone, this tutorial will help you install filters:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201304

Did you know? You can restrict SIRI web search, and restrict the game center.

If your child is using an Android device, try using a filter browser. Moblesip is reccommended especially for Androids, because once it is installed, another browser cannot override it.

If your child is using a Samsung Galaxy Tablet, a Kid’s Mode app allows you to restrict content by age.

Did you know? You can install a daily time limit on your child’s tablet with Kid’s Mode.

Other important considerations for parents…

Geotagging. Basically, geotagging is making your location -or your kid’s location- public to everyone….scary! We need to teach our kids that anything they post (including pictures!) can be seen by ANYONE and can be on the web FOREVER. For more on location safety, see this article…

Wow. I had no idea that my teenager’s cell phones might contain geotagging on their pictures. Here’s an important tip from the above site:

Don’t Geotag photos including children

“I think it is a  poor idea to geotag photos including children. It is our job to protect them.
What does this mean for photos taken at events that your school hosts? Has this been disclosed to parents? How can we educate about this?” (Cool cat teacher blog).

The author of that article pretty much sums up the main idea with her title,

“Privacy is a gift we give ourselves.”

Safety for older kids and teens

If we are discussing internet safety for kids, we cannot ignore teaching about cyberbullying, and Here is a great resource for discussing cyber bullying with your kids:

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-09-25-free-lesson-plans-and-other-resources-to-prevent-cyberbullying-and-promote-online-safety

And, did you know that 23 states now have laws against cyberbullying?

http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/is_cyberbullying_free_speech

Today, cyberbullying seems to be most prevalent on cellphones and can include invasions of privacy such as inappropriate photo sharing, etc. And here’s another new internet safety term we need to discuss with our teens: sextortion.

https://cyberbullying.com/sextortion

Sextortion is just what it sounds like: extortion in the form of sex, and in the cyberbullying world, that means blackmail by using inappropriate photos.

When we are educating older kids and teens how to stay safe on the internet, it may be helpful to define digital citizenship:

If you take a look at this video, you will see that another important component of keeping our kids safe online is media literacy, which means essentially determining the value of the vast number of media messages that they are bombarded with.

The video below provides 5 questions for media literacy, to determine the value of the media message:

Who created this message?
What creative means were used to capture my attention?
Why is this message being sent?

A Word on Tech Addiction, humane technology and video games

  1. https://humanetech.com/problem/

This website highlights my general concerns with technology; namely, that it has overwhelmed human vulnerability. And, who are among society’s most vulnerable? Our children. As a result of more and more technology, human beings face digital addition, political manipulation, superficiality, a decline in mental health, problems identifying the truth, and polarization of viewpoints. One result of inhumane technology that I see the evidence of in particular is shorter attention spans in children (and adults.) I also can see that kids are addicted to screen time and their devices, and that kids are competing for likes and shares on a superficial level.

67% of a 723-person sample of young Finnish Facebook users between ages 15 and 18 have been exposed to hate material — and exposure to online hate material is associated with poor attachment to family, lower happiness levels, physical offline victimization, and high online activity. Although this effect is correlative, it is part of a growing body of research that connects real-world issues, problems, and consequences with things that happen on online platforms.”

PEER-REVIEWED · Oksanen, Holkeri, Hawdon, and Näsi, 2014. Soul of Society: A Focus on the Lives of Children & Youth (Sociological Studies of Children and Youth, Volume 18) ↗

The above video discusses humane game design, a topic that should concern parents of kids who play video and computer games. So, how can game designers respect their players? Tips from this video ask designers to: accept the fact that games do affect people, consider what the subject matter is and how that affects society, and ensure that the time spent gaming is quality over quantity. Parents should be alert for games that focus only on profitability while sacrificing the game’s design. According to this video, humane design does not exploit friendships, does not put players gaming on a schedule, does not force players to pay money, and does not artificially exploit player’s time when reality calls.

In this video, former google design ethicist speaks out against the downgrading of humans. He says that while tech companies are upgrading technology, they are downgrading humans by working off of our primal instincts, or in other words, the animal portion of our brains. This basing technology off of our primal instincts is what can make technology so addictive to kids.

Ok, I had to include one more video about tech addition – in this video, former Silicon Valley insiders question why so many products and services are being designed specifically to addict people, especially teens. According to this video, google and apple shares are not based on how much time you access them, so these companies are in a prime place to pave the way for more humane design. This video also highlights that more time using technology is directly related to higher rates of depression and mental disorder. The bottom line? Limit your kids screen time and use common sense.

II. How has my thinking changed? It hasn’t, really, in regards to me still wanting to limit my kid’s exposure to screen time. However, I have come to realize that I can’t completely avoid it, especially as I have been spending the last week with family and kids running galore with iPads, youtube videos, and fortnite. So, if I can’t completely avoid it (which I can’t), I’ll teach my kids some common sense rules and I’ll learn how to set parental controls for when I’m not doing the Mom-helicopter maneveur that I’m oh-so-good at. What seems important is setting guidelines, and what seems less important is labeling all video and computer games as “bad” or simply forbidding my child to look at a device altogether.

I love the idea of thinking of digital citizenship as knowing how to add worthwhile content to the internet, and knowing how to act appropriately on the internet. An example of this might be teaching students to address teachers properly in emails and texts, instead of, “yo, wassup, teach?” I also like thinking about digital citizenship as an extension of citizenship in general.

I think as a result of taking this course, my opinions on limiting use of screen time and not using social media incessantly have not changed. I still believe it is more worthwhile for me and my kids to go play in the yard instead of watching youtube videos or instagram. However, after taking this class, I am more open to using the internet for specific tools such as making infographics (posterboards for grownups! And how wonderful for those of us lacking in artistic skills…) and Creative Commons licenses and resources. One future area of the internet I’d like to explore is publishing my own music (specifically for church) myself online.

III. If I can share some advice with future students, it would be this:

Choose to learn how to use the parts of the internet that pertain to you whenever possible. One thing I wanted to do but ran out of time to explore was to use a music recording program to record a piece and collaborate with a fellow student on it. I also really enjoyed using the program we used to upload videos of scenarios and answer each other’s questions. Think about what you want to learn more about that will benefit your family and your future career or classroom where you will be teaching.

Make connections with other students. I enjoyed reading everyone’s biography and learning about everyone’s unique experiences.

My disorganized and frazzled productivity

This is a picture from my actual planner. Granted, at the time I was writing letters to various people, and in general freaking out at UAA’s accreditation loss, but nevertheless, this is actually how my planner looks at the end of a week. And, believe it or not, I get things done. There is so much to keep track of, from my husband’s work schedule, to childcare, to my part-time job, to school, etc etc. I need a new system! Because looking at this makes me feel as frazzled as it probably makes you feel. With that being said, I am pretty reluctant to use any sort of electronic calendar, and enjoy the old fashioned writing down the deadlines on calendar way. I don’t have a problem actually getting things done (did I already say that?), but this is a bit disorganized, even for my taste. I’m also not sure what my solution should be besides having the patience to write a little neater, maybe in straighter lines? Possibly a bigger planner…

I bought a very large calendar which I hung in a central location in our house so that my husband and I can keep on top of each other’s schedules. However, he doesn’t actually look at it so I think I am going to try out Picnic, which is an app to syn calendars with your family, or a google calendar. While I would much prefer the traditional handwritten way, it is just not working out (could be my handwriting….)

So far…the dings on my phone that I have gotten as reminders half an hour before an event have not angered me, and have only resulted in me getting a smug little smile that I am getting a reminder about something I already knew about because it was penciled in my very messy planner….old habits die hard!

Rock Star Comment-a-nector

Here are links to my five connecting comments:

Connecting Deana and Paul on ideas about digital literacy and citizenship
answering Nina’s question with Deana’s post…
Linking Sam to Maureen’s photos since both are avid naturalists/photographers….
Linking Morgan’s extensive fair use of music post to Nina’s…because Nina is also a musician and may be interested.

Grok and Korg on the Creative Commons

For this assignment, I am discussing the Creative Commons and all of the different formats and licenses it can take, by pulling together posts by myself, Sam Starr, and Deana M. Waters.

Sam’s work that he chose to license under Creative Commons is an opinion backed by some research and reasoning, that a limited number of cow elks should be introduced to Kodiak Island. (A number of bulls make the swim over a 20 mile span of open ocean from Afognak Island, but without the cows, an elk population does not exist on Kodiak Island.)

Sam chose to license his ideas under only under the Attribution license, which means it can be reproduced and changed as others see fit. This type of licensing works well for Sam’s goal: he wants as many to be exposed to this idea as possible, so that it might be implemented someday. His work is an example of purposefully sharing an idea.

Deana’s movie that she licensed under Creative Commons, tells the then fictional (but historical fiction, as this occurred in the past!) story of the state of AK failing to fund local community schools, forcing rural residents to move to boarding schools to be educated. Deana chose to license her video under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commerical license.

Compared to the Creative Commons License that Sam chose, she has one more restriction: people cannot use her work, or other work based on hers, for profit. She writes that,

” Ten years into the future, a student in a M. Ed. program uses my digital story to examine the impact of Alaska’s 2019 education funding cuts. The student uses my initial premise that due to the cuts, rural schools close forcing rural students to leave their home communities for high school and expands on it by explaining the impact of subsequent cuts and the ensuing litigation. He attributes my original work, but is not required to follow the same licensing scheme of it.”

My own Creative Commons licensing is of a piece for chorus that I wrote to be performed in a church, or school. I chose a more restrictive licensing: Attribution, Non-Commerical, Share-Alike, because while I want people to use my original music for worship, I don’t want them to take what I’ve written and use it for profit, or change it and then use it for profit. The Share-alike portion of my license requires that if users change or adapt the work, it must still be licensed under the original license — that ensures that I still receive credit. I think this is a good choice, because if someone wants to take just the soprano or melody line and sing only that for the song, they still must attribute me. By the way, this is the main content license that Wikipedia uses.

So, there you have it. Creative Commons licensing from least-most restrictive. I think it is also interesting to note that as an idea (Sam) the least restrictive license was chosen, while work became more fixed in its details (my own), a more restrictive license was chosen.

Humane Design/Humane Technology

How it relates to Education, Technology and Privacy

I’ve covered quite a bit on humane design in technology below, so I’ll discuss education and privacy. Humane design in regards to privacy ensures that all humans have access to privacy as a basic human right, and that places, technology and products are designed with privacy in mind. In regards to education, a humane design ensures that all students can use and access all parts of a classroom. If they can’t, it is important for the teacher to come up with ways to make the place and curriculum accessible.

  1. https://humanetech.com/problem/

This website highlights my general concerns with technology; namely, that it has overwhelmed human vulnerability. As a result human beings face digital addition, political manipulation, superficiality, a decline in mental health, problems identifying the truth, and polarization of viewpoints. One result of inhumane technology that I see the evidence of in particular is shorter attention spans in children (and adults.) I also can see that kids are addicted to screen time and their devices, and that kids are competing for likes and shares on a superficial level.

“While we’ve been upgrading our technology
we’ve been downgrading humanity. “

Right? This is what I’ve been talking about!!!

2. https://ledger.humanetech.com/

This page provides some pretty staggering statistics and quotes on the effect of dehumanizing technology:

“Even the mere presence of smartphone can disrupt the connection between two people, having negative effects on closeness, connection, and conversation quality.”

PEER-REVIEWED · Przybyliski and Weinstein, 2013. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships ↗

67% of a 723-person sample of young Finnish Facebook users between ages 15 and 18 have been exposed to hate material — and exposure to online hate material is associated with poor attachment to family, lower happiness levels, physical offline victimization, and high online activity. Although this effect is correlative, it is part of a growing body of research that connects real-world issues, problems, and consequences with things that happen on online platforms. “

PEER-REVIEWED · Oksanen, Holkeri, Hawdon, and Näsi, 2014. Soul of Society: A Focus on the Lives of Children & Youth (Sociological Studies of Children and Youth, Volume 18) ↗

3.

The above video discusses humane game design, something that has been on my mind with the amount of time my older son spends gaming. So, how can game designers respect their players? Tips from this video ask designers to: accept the fact that games do affect people, consider what the subject matter is and how that affects society, and ensure that the time spent gaming is quality over quantity. So, what makes game design inhumane? Focusing only on profitability. while sacrificing the game’s design. According to this video, humane design does not exploit friendships, does not put players gaming on a schedule, does not force players to pay money, and does not artificially exploit player’s time when reality calls.

4.

This video discusses humane design at a global level, and how those living in sub-humane conditions can have their lives improved by all of us paying attention to humane design. One way to accomplish this is to decentralize the production of goods, and focus instead on developing and using local natural resources. This video asks how we can change our design solutions to encompass more people.

5.

In this video, former google design ethicist speaks out against the downgrading of humans. He says that while tech companies are upgrading technology, they are downgrading humans by working off of our primal instincts, or in other words, the animal portion of our brains. He calls for a necessary change to not base stock prices of technology off of the amount of time that people spend on it. One suggestion he has to make technology more regenerative to people is to imagine your phone as a GPS: it’s purpose is to get you back into the world, not suck you away from it.

6.

Ok, I had to include one more video about tech addition, because this is kind of my theme around the house that I am constantly harping on, and also why I have held off on buying my 6 and 3 year old any kind of electronic device of their own (even though both have already asked me for phones!) In this video, former Silicon Valley insiders question why so many products and services are being designed specifically to addict people, especially teens. According to this video, google and apple shares are not based on how much time you access them, so these companies are in a prime place to pave the way for more humane design. This video also highlights that more time using technology is directly related to higher rates of depression and mental disorder.

7.

https://www.lifefloor.com/blog-publishing/putting-humane-design-into-perspective

To wrap this up (and I am so pleased to say that as I am doing this, my kids are making sand pies in the sandbox instead of staring at a screen! Wonder how many years the sand pies will occupy for, though…), here is an article on how to make design more humane by implementing small changes. In this article Suzanne Keller (of Lifefloor, a company that produces splash pads in aquatic spaces) points out that inclusive design actually helps everyone. For example, the ADA ramp helps not only those in a wheelchair, but also the elderly, those who are overweight, and the caretaker pushing a stroller.

“You start life with a mobility impairment, and most people will end life with one. If to have mobility challenges is to be human, design that doesn’t take these issues into account isn’t merely non-inclusive, it’s actually inhumane. This concept is foundational to the design philosophy at Life Floor; good design is helpful to everyone.”

Chief Officer, Sean Rubin,of LifeFloor

Fire Away!

My three questions, after researching ADA, universal design, section 504 and Title II are :

  1. Are gyms required to be accessible by all? I’m guessing the pool and entryway to pool and locker rooms are, but what about equipment?
  2. Are websites legally obligated to be accessible? I was really surprised to hear that there have been many lawsuits over website accessibility.
  3. Where does it end? I don’t mean to sound like a jerk, but…although it seems like all of these regulations have a place in protecting people who need protection, there are so many ways that the laws can be taken advantage of. For example, the idea of sueing someone over their website not being accessible seems a bit…silly. Maybe I’m not thinking correctly of the right scenario. Or not being a sensitive human being. But honestly, I think the cold hard truth is that it is impossible to make everything accessible to everyone.
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